CAREER EVENING: The evolution of work

urailta
Etelä-Suomi
03.12.2020 -
17:00 to 19:30
MESSUKESKUS, CONFERENCE ROOM 208
Rautatieläisenkatu 3
00520
Helsinki

The evolution of work

The evolution of work can be summarized in one simple sentence: from muscles to head to heart. Perttu Pölönen believes human aspects and multidisciplinary thinking will be fundamental in the future, to counterbalance technological advancements.

The speed of change in working life will change the direction of our careers as well whether we wanted or not. Our knowledge and skills will become obsolete as technology advances. There are no secure jobs or bulletproof careers anymore – the responsibility is now on our shoulders. What kind of skills should we develop for the future? Specialist or generalist? To understand what skills will become essential, we need to understand what makes us different from machines.

Will we see a human revolution?

In this career evening you will learn more about:

  • Evolution of work
  • Humans vs machines
  • Future curriculum
  • Identity & purpose

Perttu Pölönen has been given many titles, such as inventor, author, composer, keynote speaker, futurist and visionaire. He’s at the intersection of technology, art and science. Perttu is a classically trained composer by education, however, he has also won the biggest science fair in Europe, the European Union's Competition for Young Scientists.

Perttu has studied exponential technologies at Singularity University, based at NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley. While in California, he co-founded a non-profit, 360ed, that develops AR apps for the education sector in developing countries. Tech Review has honored Perttu among 35 Innovators Under 35 in Europe. In January 2020 Perttu’s first book, “Curriculum for the Future”, was published in Finland and the first edition was sold out within the first weeks. Perttu Pölönen is an inspiring and thought-provoking speaker who fosters optimism for the future. Perttu has received excellent feedback on his ability to encourage his audience to think bigger.